DOE Student Accounts

Starting September 2020, all students will use their DOE student account to log into TeachHub. TeachHub allows students to access several apps, such as Google Classroom, Zoom, MyON, and more. The DOE student accounts end in @nycstudents.net. Students will no longer be using their @ps7queens.org google accounts.

Please help your child log into their new account by following the steps in the letter below. You should have received your child’s username (email) and password from the classroom teacher.

Important: Once you are signed into Google Classroom (using the DOE account), click “Join” on the class invitation. This will help your child get ready for the new school year.

Bookmark the TeachHub link (teachhub.schools.nyc) for easier access.

Report Cards

Report cards will be distributed to your NYC Schools Account on Monday, June 29. The NYC Schools Account (NYCSA) is an app that lets you see your child’s grades, attendance, fitness results, schedule, and more.

To create an account, select a language below and follow the steps in the letter. You should have received an account creation code from your child’s teacher. If you need a new account creation code, please contact our Parent Coordinator, Tanya Melito (tmelito@schools.nyc.gov).

If you already have a NYCSA account, you can sign in at mystudent.nyc.

Together for Justice – A Message for Families from Chancellor Carranza

“Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced.”

James Baldwin

Dear Families,

It is hard to recall another time as gut-wrenching and heartbreaking as these recent days have been. George Floyd’s murder at the hands of police officers last week was horrifying. I am sickened. But, like many of you, I am not surprised. We have seen this abominable disregard for Black lives so many times before, including multiple times in recent weeks. It is truly agonizing to witness; it is nothing short of another pandemic presenting itself on the streets of America.

The New York City Department of Education condemns police brutality and this brutal loss of life. My heart breaks to know that yet another Black family has lost a son, a father, a brother. I stand in solidarity with Black New Yorkers and Americans, and with everyone who is mourning yet another senseless loss. Pain ripples and resonates across communities all over the City. I am with all of you as we individually and collectively reckon with this tragic injustice. The demonstrations happening in the five boroughs and in nearly 140 cities across the country are a reflection of this anguish, and the desire for a better world.

It is incredibly difficult to be a parent or caregiver right now: grappling with emotions, seeking actions that both feel of service and of the magnitude needed in this moment, and thinking through ways to begin or deepen conversations with children and families about recent horrific incidents and the systemic racism from which they spring—all at the same time. The pain and struggle are very real.

For communities of color, nothing about this pain is new. It’s been in the bodies, minds, and hearts of millions of New Yorkers and Americans for generations—because racist violence has been perpetrated for that long.

Racism also causes new harm in other ways, every day, because it is systemic—woven deeply into the fabric of our institutions, our economy, and the systems that make up our shared community. That is true in New York City, as progressive and forward-thinking as we are, including in our public school system.

At the DOE we have said, and we will continue to say: no more.

We must answer the call to be actively anti-racist and work every day to undo these systems of injustice. We will continue in our resolve to advance equity now. We will honor the dignity and humanity of every student, parent, educator, employee and member of our community every day.

No matter the form teaching and learning takes—in brick-and-mortar classrooms or on a digital device—the goal remains the same: providing an excellent education to every single student. In doing so, we must also continually find ways to dismantle institutional racism and reverse its effects.

That work is underway. It includes implementing restorative practices, training all educators and employees on implicit bias, providing mental health supports to school communities, and more. This work creates a lifelong effect in children and has the potential to transform our society in ways that make that the world safer, more just, and better for everyone.

When, for example, children learn from books featuring protagonists and lessons featuring stories from people of different races, abilities, genders, ethnicities, languages, and more, they learn also to value difference and diversity. When students experiencing anger or resentment are taught healthy ways to communicate, it’s more likely they won’t react out of unfounded fear.

We will not relent in the work to intensify equity until, student by student and school by school, change comes. We all need this, because racism doesn’t just harm Black, Brown, or Asian families—it harms us all.

Everyone has a role to play. In addition to continuing our work centrally, we are supporting educators with resources to teach episodes from our history and our present, episodes where these same shudders of injustice and outrage, peaceful protest, and also violence and destruction have ripped through our city and society.

At the same time, many of you have already been doing this work at home or are otherwise putting personal resources into these efforts—your time, your energy, your heart, or your voice. We see you, and we are grateful for your powerful commitment. Children see and feel the world around them, and now is an important time to guide them in understanding and engaging with their experiences and those of their friends, families, and fellow New Yorkers.

Below you will find resources to help start, continue, or deepen conversations with children about racism and injustice. We are also sharing resources to help with stress, exhaustion, and self-care. As parents and caregivers, caring for yourself is essential in order to be able to care for others. We will continue to update resources as we move ahead, and you can find them at schools.nyc.gov/togetherforjustice

I have been reminded of this quote by the writer James Baldwin that resonates so powerfully in this moment: “Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced.” These are difficult days of reckoning, but we have the opportunity—and a calling—to go farther in facing injustice.

You are our most important partners in the education of the children of New York City and the building of a better world. We are grateful for you today and every day.

Sincerely,

Richard A. Carranza
Chancellor
New York City Department of Education


You may also download the letter by selecting your language below:

Update from Chancellor Carranza on MIS-C

Dear Families,

The health and safety of our communities remains our top priority, and we will continue to take all appropriate measures to help keep our students, families, and staff members safe. Two weeks ago, we shared some information with you regarding the Pediatric Multi-System Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (PMIS), a rare condition that is potentially life-threatening in children. Last week, we learned from DOHMH that the condition was renamed Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C). Guidance issued by DOHMH remains in place, and we urge you to visit nyc.gov/health at any time for this important information related to MIS-C. There, you will also find the MIS-C Fact Sheet, provided last week and newly translated into multiple languages here.

  • Consistent with Executive Order 202.17: all people over the age of two who can medically tolerate a face covering must wear one when they are outside their home if they cannot maintain physical distance from others. Free face coverings are available at DOE Meal Hubs in all five boroughs—you can find one close to you on the DOE website.
  • Physical distancing and good hygiene remain critical, even while wearing a face covering.
  • When outside the home, adults and children must maintain at least 6 feet of distance between themselves and others whenever possible.
  • Parents should remind children of the importance of good hand hygiene and should help ensure that children frequently wash their hands.

As a gentle reminder, families should continue to discuss with their children the importance of the following measures and ensure your children are doing the following:

We will continue to communicate with you on a weekly basis regarding MIS-C. Please visit nyc.gov/health at any time for the latest information on MIS-C, and do not hesitate to contact 311 with any questions.

Sincerely,

Richard A. Carranza

Chancellor
New York City Department of Education

MySchools Account

Good news! Your child’s middle school offer is now available in your MySchools account at

 www.myschools.nyc

A printed copy will also be mailed to your home address shortly. If you are happy with your offer, there is nothing further you have to do.

Beginning the week of April 13th, you will be able to see:

1. The waitlists your child is on
2. Check your position on each waitlist
3. Add yourself on waitlists of schools you wish to apply to
4. Remove yourself from waitlists of schools you DO NOT wish to attend

For example, if you received your third choice on your application as your main offer, you will be on the waitlist for your first and second choice.

If you did not set up a MySchools account, I have contacted you to let you know what school your child received as their main offer.

You can also check out the Middle School section on the www.schools.nyc.gov website for more information.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Ms. Brody via the Remind App (Send a text to 81010 and text @47bd89), in the google classroom (code: thuf7v2) and/or at my email at tbrody2@schools.nyc.gov.

P.S. 7 Thanks You

From everyone at P.S.7, we’d like to say thank you to all those who have helped make this difficult time just a little easier. Please click below to watch a video we made to express our gratitude

A video featuring Thank You signs created by the students and staff of P.S. 7